Your Sky Tonight The SuperEarth Around Barnards Star

Located in the constellation Ophiuchus, there is an unremarkable red dwarf star some six light years away. After the three stars of the Alpha Centauri system, this is the closest star to us. Known as Barnard’s star, it is invisible to the unaided

3795 Views | Published on 22nd Nov, 2018

Located in the constellation Ophiuchus, there is an unremarkable red dwarf star some six light years away. After the three stars of the Alpha Centauri system, this is the closest star to us.

Known as Barnard’s star, it is invisible to the unaided eye. It’s name comes from it’s discoverer E.E. Barnard, who in 1916 noticed that this star was wobbling back and forth by some 10.3 arcseconds every year. Astronomers thought there must be some unseen companion orbiting around it, but for over a century, couldn’t find it. Was it a dim star? Or was it a planet? Why was this star wobbling?

Now, we know.

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